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Seven feet tall and male? Congrats, you’ve got a one in seven shot at making the N.B.A.

Seven feet tall and male? Congrats, you’ve got a one in seven shot at making the N.B.A.

If you’ve ever wished you were a little bit taller, wished you were a baller, then you probably shouldn’t look at this graphic from the New York Times and economist Seth Stephens-Davidowitz. While people 6’8″ to 6’11” have a 1 in 200 shot of making it into the N.B.A, those under six feet face 1 in 1.2 million odds. And everyone under 7′ has it bad compared to those above that. Seven-footers have a startling 1 in 7 chance of making it to the N.B.A.

Stephens-Davidowitz also found that social factors matter. Black N.B.A. players are less likely than the average black man in America to be born to single or teen mothers, and are less likely to be given unique names (which often serves as a class signifier). They’re also less likely to have grown up in poor neighborhoods. Click “Know More” to see more of Stephens-Davidowitz’s findings.

Dylan Matthews | November 26, 2013 at 9:16 am
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