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Immigrants are less likely to do just about every bad thing a person can do

Immigrants are less likely to do just about every bad thing a person can do

Quick question — who’s likelier to make money illegally, an immigrant to the U.S. or someone who was born here? The native-born guy. Who’s likelier to start a fight? The native-born guy. To beat their partner? The native-born guy. To get a lot of traffic tickets? The native-born guy.

That’s the conclusion of Michael G. Vaughn, Christopher P. Salas-Wright, Matt DeLisi, and Brandy R. Maynard, whose paper “The immigrant paradox: immigrants are less antisocial than native-born Americans” documents these and other antisocial behaviors in which native-born Americans engage more frequently than immigrants.

Hat-tip to Michael Clemens. The paper itself is paywalled, unfortunately, but click “Know More” to read about other evidence demonstrating that immigrants are less likely to commit crimes.

Dylan Matthews | December 5, 2013 at 2:35 pm
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