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This chart shows which countries have the worst gambling problems

An Australian adult loses, on average, more than $1,000 every year through gambling. (That’s about 1,100 Australian dollars.) They’re not even throwing it away in style: typically, Australians gamble with machines outside of casinos, as shown in the chart above from The Economist.

Americans have nothing to brag about, however. In total, we lose $119 billion every year, the most of any country. That’s an average of nearly $500 per person, most of it in casinos. Learn to count cards, people. It isn’t that hard.

Japan is an interesting case. There is no casino gambling there. Instead, people play a kind of pinball slot machine called “pachinko” in parlors that are not legally casinos. It’s a popular game — Japanese adults lose about $100 in pachinko parlors annually.

The Germans are at the bottom of this list, confirming all of our national stereotypes about them. Click below for more analysis.

Max Ehrenfreund | February 4, 2014 at 11:13 am
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