Skip navigation
No more
Know more

The sun rises over the North Pole for the first time in 6 months

Thursday, March 20, was the first day of spring in the northern hemisphere, as the sun rose over the North Pole for the first time in six months and day and night each lasted about 12 hours at other latitudes. The chart above shows the hours of daylight at each latitude throughout the year, the vertical blue lines marking the spring and fall equinoxes and the summer and winter solstices. At about 39 degrees north, Washington, D.C. is just below the horizontal blue line across the chart. By early May, the nation’s capital will be enjoying more than fourteen hours a day of sunlight.

Image by Cmglee via Wikimedia Commons used under the Creative Commons license. Click below to keep reading about the equinox.

Max Ehrenfreund | March 21, 2014 at 9:04 am
Know more: Winter maintains its icy grip on North America
No more
Know more
The incredible power of the measles vaccine, in one graph
Ana Swanson
No more
Know more
The history of American inequality, in 1 fascinating chart
Ana Swanson
ADVERTISEMENT
No more
Know more
Americans are driving less than we ever expected
Ana Swanson
No more
Know more
Americans believe in religious freedom — just not for Muslims
Ana Swanson
No more
Know more
What California’s drought looks like from space
Ana Swanson
No more
Know more
A map shows hundreds of submerged shipwrecks off the U.S. coast
Ana Swanson
No more
Know more
Once upon a time, Europeans thought California was an island
Ana Swanson
No more
Know more
Map: Where $1.7 billion in military equipment has gone to in the states
Ana Swanson
No more
Know more
The world’s worst cities for gridlock
Ana Swanson
No more
Know more
The country with the most powerful passport is pretty much what you’d expect
Ana Swanson
No more
Know more
Charted: What punk, rap, country and folk artists are likely to die from
Ana Swanson