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The sun rises over the North Pole for the first time in 6 months

Thursday, March 20, was the first day of spring in the northern hemisphere, as the sun rose over the North Pole for the first time in six months and day and night each lasted about 12 hours at other latitudes. The chart above shows the hours of daylight at each latitude throughout the year, the vertical blue lines marking the spring and fall equinoxes and the summer and winter solstices. At about 39 degrees north, Washington, D.C. is just below the horizontal blue line across the chart. By early May, the nation’s capital will be enjoying more than fourteen hours a day of sunlight.

Image by Cmglee via Wikimedia Commons used under the Creative Commons license. Click below to keep reading about the equinox.

Max Ehrenfreund | March 21, 2014 at 9:04 am
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