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Even if you graduate with a STEM major, you’re likely to work in a different field

Even if you graduate with a STEM major, you’re likely to work in a different field

Data from the Census shows that surprisingly few students who major in science, technology, engineering and mathematics go on to work in those fields — even if you exclude psychology and the social sciences, which the Census dubiously counts as STEM disciplines. This suggests we need to reconsider our habit of encouraging young people to major in these areas, at least until we first determine why so few of those who already do find a way to put their skills to use.

Max Ehrenfreund | July 11, 2014 at 9:54 am
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